Where the grid ends: West 220th Street and Broadway. The last street in Manhattan meets the original off-the-grid Avenue. Technically Manhattan borough has streets up to 228th Street, but the last eight streets are across the river in The Bronx. The last numbered street on the island of Manhattan is 220th.

  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S5100
  2. Aperture: f/5.6
  3. Exposure: 1/420th
  4. Focal Length: 31mm

=Grand Central Terminal’s astronomical ceiling shows the sky backwards. This is one of New York’s finest interior spaces.

  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S5100
  2. Aperture: f/2.9
  3. Exposure: 1/4th
  4. Focal Length: 7mm

Macdougal Street in the West Village. Named for Alexander Macdougal, a Scottish born New Yorker who served as a Major General in the Revolutionary War and after the war was the first president of the Bank of New York.

  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S5100
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/320th
  4. Focal Length: 5mm

Hudson River Park in lower Manhattan with the Verrazano Narrows Bridge in the distance. The park is long and skinny, running from the Battery all the way up to 59th Street, with great Hudson River views on one side and great skyline views on the other. 

  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S5100
  2. Aperture: f/5
  3. Exposure: 1/340th
  4. Focal Length: 22mm
  1. I am surprised at how hilly Manhattan is. Having spent the majority of my time on the grid in midtown I assumed the island was all flat. It is not. Duh. Washington Heights is really up on a commanding height. Murray Hill is aptly named and rises up from 34th Street. Walk from Central Park West down to Riverside drive on 94th Street and you walk down hill the entire way.  ”Mannahatta” translates to “island of hills” after all. Walk around Upper Manhattan and you will get the idea.
  2. I am surprised at how safe the island is. Growing up there were definite neighborhoods you would steer clear of and avoid including Harlem, West 42nd Street and the Lower East Side. During my odyssey there really wasn’t one neighborhood where I thought it was unsafe.
  3. How much Beaux-Arts architecture there is in Manhattan. Beaux Arts architecture flourished between 1880 and 1920 and features elaborate ornamentation. Columbia University, the Custom House, the Ansonia apartment building, the buildings in Audubon Terrace, the old Fire Department Headquarters, The New York Public Library, Grand Central Terminal and the Main Post Office are the most visible examples, but many of the finest mansions, townhouses and club buildings in the city are also in the Beaux-Arts style. Art Deco forms the core iconic style of Manhattan with the Empire State building, Chrysler building, the Fuller building, Rockefeller Center, and 70 Pine street among the best.
  4. The amount of wealth found throughout the city and especially in certain concentrated areas on the Upper East Side whose 10021 Zip Code is the wealthiest in the U.S. The affluent places to live go on, and on and on…Sutton Place, Beekman Place, Central Park South, Central Park West, Fifth Avenue, Time Warner Center and Soho. Most people never make in a lifetime what it costs to live in most of these places.
  5. How many streets or neighborhoods are named for people who owned large farms or estates on the island: Beekman, Sutton, Lenox, Astor, Lispenard, Rutgers, Stuyvesant, Hamilton and Murray. You just don’t think of Manhattan as ever having had farms.
  6. How much military history there is in Manhattan. The island has multiple massive armories, war statues, cold war fallout shelters, Revolutionary War sites, Castle Clinton was built for the War or 1812, the Arsenal in Central Park housed troops in the Civil War. The Soldiers’ & Sailors’ monument in Riverside Park honors New York’s Civil War soldiers
  7. How much the distinctive architectural style is related to a small concentration of architects: Carrere and Hastings, McKim, Mead and White, Delano and Aldrich, Cass Gilbert, Raymond Hood, Cross & Cross, and Warren and Wetmore.
  8. How few people are out in the early morning and how peaceful the city is then. I took many of my pictures after sun-rise and often there were no more than a few people around.
  9. How many historic districts there are in Manhattan. It has 54 separate districts, each worth a visit.
  10. How many great parks Manhattan has aside from Central Park (which warrants a full day of visiting at least), they are too numerous to name but favorites include Riverside, Bryant, Katharine Hepburn, Straus, Tudor City, Madison Square, Union Square and the High Line.

Places where you turn the corner and say “wow!”

  1. Conservatory Garden Central Park
  2. Bow Bridge Central Park
  3. The interior of 32 Sixth Avenue, the former AT&T Long Distance building in Tribeca
  4. The Church of the Transfiguration in the Murray Hill/Flatiron District
  5. Sniffen Court Historic District in Murray Hill
  6. The Jumel Terrace Historic Distrct and the Morris-Jumel Mansion
  7. Trinity Church Cemetery in Washington Heights
  8. "The Mall" and its amazing allée of trees in Central Park
  9. The Players Club and National Arts Club side-by-side on Gramercy Park South
  10. Carl Schurz Park, East End Avenue in the 80s

Spring tulips at the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue

  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S5100
  2. Aperture: f/3.1
  3. Exposure: 1/50th
  4. Focal Length: 27mm

The Custom House in Lower Manhattan near Bowling Green. One of the largest Beaux-Arts buildings in the city, it was designed by Cass Gilbert who also designed the nearby Woolworth building.

  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S5100
  2. Aperture: f/3.1
  3. Exposure: 1/170th
  4. Focal Length: 17mm

The Dutch colonial Dyckman Farmhouse still sits above Broadway at 214th Street. It was built in 1784 by Dutch farmer William Dyckman, whose farm was over 250 acres at one time.

  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S5100
  2. Aperture: f/4
  3. Exposure: 1/350th
  4. Focal Length: 5mm

Columbia University’s 1929 Boat House on Spuyten Duyvil (dutch for Devil’s Spout because the currents are so bad). An ivy league boat house that would look equally at home on the Charles River, Schuylkill River or Carnegie Lake, is right here in Manhattan off 218th Street.

  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S5100
  2. Aperture: f/3.1
  3. Exposure: 1/420th
  4. Focal Length: 34mm

The Beaux-Arts Surrogate’s Court Building on Chambers Street behind City Hall is one of the most ornamented buildings in Manhattan with 54 sculptures on the exterior. The building has been used to film the TV show Law & Order. The interior of the building is one of the most beautiful in the city, but due to heightened security, I was not able to take a picture of it.

  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S5100
  2. Aperture: f/3.1
  3. Exposure: 1/58th
  4. Focal Length: 15mm

St. Andrew’s Church in the Financial District is a Roman Catholic Church located  on Cardinal Hayes Place, near City Hall

  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S5100
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/30th
  4. Focal Length: 5mm

12/19 The Manhattan Municipal Building at Chambers and Centre Streets is a behemoth of a building. Above the Corinthian columns of the front facade there are various words etched into the stone including “New Amsterdam”. The seal of New Netherland was a beaver ringed by the words “Sigillum Novi Belgii”. 

  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S5100
  2. Aperture: f/3.1
  3. Exposure: 1/28th
  4. Focal Length: 27mm

An armillary sphere sits in the .05-acre Winston Churchill Square Park located on Sixth Avenue between Downing and Carmine Streets behind a gated iron fence

  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S5100
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/4th
  4. Focal Length: 5mm

Built in 1907, 7 East 91st Street is another amazing example of how the Upper East Side is defined by the many Beaux-Arts mansions that run up and down the streets off of Fifth Avenue. The building is now occupied by an all-girls school. The architects, Warren and Wetmore, also designed Grand Central.

  1. Camera: Fujifilm FinePix S5100
  2. Aperture: f/2.9
  3. Exposure: 1/240th
  4. Focal Length: 7mm